Many New York households include wives and mothers who have stayed at home during their childbearing years. Perhaps, you earned a college degree, then sacrificed a career because you wanted to be home full-time with your children. Maybe you chose to forgo post-secondary education altogether or have been working your way toward earning a degree online from home.

Regardless of how your particular situation might differ from someone else’s, if the new year is likely going to include filing for divorce, you can probably relate to others who have trod similar paths and worried about finances because they had been full-time, stay-at-home parents during marriage. A first logical step to take is to build a strong support network.

Keep these issues in mind

Divorce proceedings are always somewhat unique to a specific couple’s circumstances. However, the following list includes common issues that are important to remember as you work toward achieving a fair settlement:

  • Just as you have no doubt reminded your kids to keep their schoolwork organized and to be prepared for class each day, it is critical that you walk the walk and don’t just talk the talk when it comes to divorce. Know how to access all of your bank statements, tax information and other important documents, as well as carefully review their content before heading to court.
  • Think ahead about your future budget and what your living expenses might be once you and your spouse have separate households. Especially if you’ve been completely dependent on your spouse’s income during marriage, you might feel overwhelmed at the prospect of trying to find a job that pays enough to make ends meet and to provide for your children on your own.
  • Financial analysts, people who have gone through similar experiences, attorneys and others can provide guidance and support as you make plans for a new future as a single parent.
  • Having a clear idea in mind of what you hope to get out of a settlement helps streamline negotiations or litigation proceedings. Think ahead, know what you and your kids need, and also know your rights regarding property division.
  • It would definitely be helpful if you have employment prospects or even a new job before you settle your divorce.

Your children, of course, are your highest priority. If you and your spouse disagree on child custody, visitation or child support issues, you may need to let the court make such decisions on your behalf. The good news is that you do not have to resolve any divorce-related issue on your own.

By relying on support resources available, you can achieve a fair and agreeable settlement in as swift and economically feasible a manner as possible.